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Submitted by Richard_Li on Wed, 09/14/2022 - 21:16
Aliases
National Indigenous Australians Agency

Lead Body
No
Employment Arrangements

Annual report prepared under section 46 of the PGPA Act.
Additional annual report requirement
No

Section 35 of the PGPA Act applies
Yes
Section 35(3) of the PGPA Act applies
Yes

Outcome #1: Lead the development and implementation of the Australian Government's agenda to improve the lives of lndigenous Australians through focusing on place-based solutions, working in partnership, and effectively delivering programs
# Program Body Contribution
1.1 Jobs, Land and the Economy National Indigenous Australians Agency

The objectives of program 1.1 are to enhance Indigenous Australians economic rights, improve employment and pathways to jobs, foster Indigenous business and assist Indigenous people to generate economic and social benefits from effective use of their land and waters, particularly in remote areas

1.2 Children and Schooling National Indigenous Australians Agency

The objectives of program 2.1 are to support early childhood development and wellbeing, school attendance, attainment and improved post school pathways, particularly in remote Indigenous communities. This program includes measures to improve access to further education

1.3 Safety and Wellbeing National Indigenous Australians Agency

The objectives of program 1.3 are to improve mental health and wellbeing outcomes and ensure Indigenous people, including young Indigenous Australians, enjoy similar levels of physical, emotional and social wellbeing enjoyed by other Australians, and are safe in their homes, families and communities

1.4 Culture and Capability National Indigenous Australians Agency

The objectives of program 1.4 are to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to maintain their culture, participate equally in the economic and social life of the nation and ensuring that Indigenous organisations are capable of delivering quality services to their clients, particularly in remote areas

1.5 Remote Australia Strategies National Indigenous Australians Agency
1.6 Evaluation and Research National Indigenous Australians Agency

The objective of program 1.6 is to improve the lives of Indigenous Australians by incorporating evaluation of and research into policies and programs impacting on Indigenous peoples delivered by the NIAA

1.7 Program Support National Indigenous Australians Agency

This program is the departmental support program to the activities of the NIAA as directed by Government

# Program Body Contribution
1.1 Attorney-General's Department Operating Expenses- Legal Services and Families Attorney-General's Department

The Attorney-General's Department (AGD) works with the NIAA by supporting the efficient operation of the native title system. AGD works with the NIAA by supporting the objective and principles of legal assistance services and funding under the National Strategic Framework for Legal Assistance. AGD contributes to the objectives of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) and the justice targets under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap by administering the National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020-25 (NLAP) that includes funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (ATSILS) to deliver culturally appropriate services consistent with self-determination and to improve justice outcomes for First Nations Australians. The AGD further contributes to the National Agreement justice targets by providing funding to the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (NATSILS) and supporting collaboration and genuine partnership with First Nations organisations.

1.4 Justice Services Attorney-General's Department

The Attorney-General's Department (AGD) works with the NIAA by supporting the efficient operation of the native title system. AGD works with the NIAA by supporting the objective and principles of legal assistance services and funding under the National Strategic Framework for Legal Assistance. AGD contributes to the objectives of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) and the justice targets under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap by administering the National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020-25 (NLAP) that includes funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (ATSILS) to deliver culturally appropriate services consistent with self-determination and to improve justice outcomes for First Nations Australians. The AGD further contributes to the National Agreement justice targets by providing funding to the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (NATSILS) and supporting collaboration and genuine partnership with First Nations organisations.

1.2 Sustainable Management - Natural Resources Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry and the NIAA partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ranger groups to deliver biosecurity work that protects Australian agriculture and the northern Australian environment.

2.1 Biosecurity and Export Services Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry and the NIAA partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ranger groups to deliver biosecurity work that protects Australian agriculture and the northern Australian environment.

1.1 Sustainable Management of Natural Resources and the Environment Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water

The Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water works with the NIAA to provide opportunities for Indigenous communities and land managers to engage with the National Landcare Program.

1.1 Employment Services Department of Employment and Workplace Relations

The Department of Employment and Workplace foster a productive and competitive labour market through policies and programs that assist job seekers into work, including secure work, and meet employer and industry needs.

2.2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Department of Health and Aged Care

The NIAA works closely with the Department of Health and Aged Care to ensure the effectiveness of Indigenous health funding, and that mainstream policy, programs and services deliver benefits to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The NIAA also provides grants for health, wellbeing and resilience projects; reduced substance misuse and harm minimisation projects; and projects aimed at combating petrol sniffing and the use of other volatile substances.

1.2 Growing innovative and competitive businesses, industries and regions Department of Industry, Science and Resources

The NIAA is implementing initiatives that enable Indigenous Australians to benefit economically from their land. The department has been consulting with the NIAA on its implementation of a Darwin Indigenous Business and Employment Hub to encourage access to mainstream business support offerings. The department has contributed to the development of NIAA's National Roadmap for Indigenous Skills, Jobs and Wealth Creation and will continue to work cooperatively to identify and enable opportunities for Indigenous Australians across industry, including manufacturing.

1.2.11 1.2.1 - Component 1 (Age Pension) Department of Social Services

The Department of Social Services (DSS) has policy responsibility for student payments, including ABSTUDY, which provide financial assistance to Indigenous families and students to encourage attendance and retention at school. Some payments (i.e. Relocation Scholarships and Student Start-up Loans) are subject to mutual exclusion provisions for some scholarships which are administered by the NIAA (i.e. Commonwealth Accommodation Costs Scholarship and Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarship) preventing double payment for the same period. DSS contributes to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) by supporting the development of stronger families and more resilient communities. This includes supporting Indigenous families and communities to enjoy similar levels of physical emotional and social wellbeing to that enjoyed by other Australians; supporting families to give children a good start in life; supporting access to affordable housing; and supporting remote strategic investments and remote housing strategies. DSS also contributes to the IAS by supporting eligible Indigenous Australians living in non-remote regions with a disability into work. DSS has funded a new primary national collection of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This will form a significant part of the evidence-base on violence against women and children, and address the gap in data on violence experienced by First Nations peoples. The data collected will inform reporting on Closing the Gap Target 13. DSS works with state and territory governments under Safe and Supported: the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2021-2031 (Safe and Supported) to improve outcomes for children and families who are experiencing disadvantage and/or who are vulnerable. The four focus areas of the National Framework are: early intervention and targeted support for children and families; addressing the over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection systems; improved information and data capability; and strengthening the child and family sector and workforce capability. Safe and Supported is the primary Commonwealth mechanism to support the achievement of Target 12 under the Closing the Gap National Agreement, which seeks to reduce the rate of over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 45 per cent by 2031. DSS is working closely with state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and non-government organisations to develop Safe and Supported first set of Action Plans, including an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan. DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on Domestic and Family Violence, developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan to end violence against women and children. DSS is also working with state and territory governments to finalise the National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children 2022-32 (The National Plan). As part of this work, DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on domestic, family and sexual violence (the Advisory Council). The Advisory Council has been tasked with the development of a specific Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan under the National Plan, and will be consulting widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities during 2022. DSS is also leading the implementation of the Commonwealth response to the recommendations and findings of the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory, working closely with the NIAA, in partnership with the Northern Territory Government and non-government organisations and local communities. DSS is working with the NIAA and the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations on the reform of the Community Development Program (CDP). The Australian Government is committed to delivering a program with real jobs, proper wages and decent conditions. As a first step, CDP providers have been given the opportunity to work with remote communities to trial new approaches to real jobs for income support recipients in remote areas. DSS conducts the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children. The study started in 2008 and follows the development of two cohorts of up to 1,700 children as they transition from infants all the way to adulthood. A range of physical, social and economic information about the child and their family is collected annually. Survey results are used to understand what helps Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children grow up strong. Microdata is publicly released to approved researchers through the Australian Data Archive. DSS is also leading the Early Childhood Targeted Action Plan to support Australia's Disability Strategy 2021-31. It aims to strengthen early identification, information, supports and pathways for young children with disability or developmental concerns, their parent and carers. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse children, their parents and carers. It will also encourage better collaboration between programs and services to support the development and wellbeing of children to help them thrive across and between life stages. DSS is progressing a number of activities to develop the new National Early Childhood program for children with disability or developmental concerns with service delivery expected to commence in late 2022. The program will deliver a range of disability-specific information, workshops and supported playgroups for young children aged 0 to 8 years with disability or developmental concerns. The new program will assist in meeting the Closing the Gap Target 4 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years.

1.3.11 1.3.1 - Component 1 (Disability Support Pension) Department of Social Services

The Department of Social Services (DSS) has policy responsibility for student payments, including ABSTUDY, which provide financial assistance to Indigenous families and students to encourage attendance and retention at school. Some payments (i.e. Relocation Scholarships and Student Start-up Loans) are subject to mutual exclusion provisions for some scholarships which are administered by the NIAA (i.e. Commonwealth Accommodation Costs Scholarship and Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarship) preventing double payment for the same period. DSS contributes to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) by supporting the development of stronger families and more resilient communities. This includes supporting Indigenous families and communities to enjoy similar levels of physical emotional and social wellbeing to that enjoyed by other Australians; supporting families to give children a good start in life; supporting access to affordable housing; and supporting remote strategic investments and remote housing strategies. DSS also contributes to the IAS by supporting eligible Indigenous Australians living in non-remote regions with a disability into work. DSS has funded a new primary national collection of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This will form a significant part of the evidence-base on violence against women and children, and address the gap in data on violence experienced by First Nations peoples. The data collected will inform reporting on Closing the Gap Target 13. DSS works with state and territory governments under Safe and Supported: the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2021-2031 (Safe and Supported) to improve outcomes for children and families who are experiencing disadvantage and/or who are vulnerable. The four focus areas of the National Framework are: early intervention and targeted support for children and families; addressing the over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection systems; improved information and data capability; and strengthening the child and family sector and workforce capability. Safe and Supported is the primary Commonwealth mechanism to support the achievement of Target 12 under the Closing the Gap National Agreement, which seeks to reduce the rate of over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 45 per cent by 2031. DSS is working closely with state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and non-government organisations to develop Safe and Supported first set of Action Plans, including an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan. DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on Domestic and Family Violence, developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan to end violence against women and children. DSS is also working with state and territory governments to finalise the National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children 2022-32 (The National Plan). As part of this work, DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on domestic, family and sexual violence (the Advisory Council). The Advisory Council has been tasked with the development of a specific Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan under the National Plan, and will be consulting widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities during 2022. DSS is also leading the implementation of the Commonwealth response to the recommendations and findings of the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory, working closely with the NIAA, in partnership with the Northern Territory Government and non-government organisations and local communities. DSS is working with the NIAA and the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations on the reform of the Community Development Program (CDP). The Australian Government is committed to delivering a program with real jobs, proper wages and decent conditions. As a first step, CDP providers have been given the opportunity to work with remote communities to trial new approaches to real jobs for income support recipients in remote areas. DSS conducts the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children. The study started in 2008 and follows the development of two cohorts of up to 1,700 children as they transition from infants all the way to adulthood. A range of physical, social and economic information about the child and their family is collected annually. Survey results are used to understand what helps Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children grow up strong. Microdata is publicly released to approved researchers through the Australian Data Archive. DSS is also leading the Early Childhood Targeted Action Plan to support Australia's Disability Strategy 2021-31. It aims to strengthen early identification, information, supports and pathways for young children with disability or developmental concerns, their parent and carers. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse children, their parents and carers. It will also encourage better collaboration between programs and services to support the development and wellbeing of children to help them thrive across and between life stages. DSS is progressing a number of activities to develop the new National Early Childhood program for children with disability or developmental concerns with service delivery expected to commence in late 2022. The program will deliver a range of disability-specific information, workshops and supported playgroups for young children aged 0 to 8 years with disability or developmental concerns. The new program will assist in meeting the Closing the Gap Target 4 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years.

1.4.11 1.4.1 - Component 1 (Carer Payment) Department of Social Services

The Department of Social Services (DSS) has policy responsibility for student payments, including ABSTUDY, which provide financial assistance to Indigenous families and students to encourage attendance and retention at school. Some payments (i.e. Relocation Scholarships and Student Start-up Loans) are subject to mutual exclusion provisions for some scholarships which are administered by the NIAA (i.e. Commonwealth Accommodation Costs Scholarship and Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarship) preventing double payment for the same period. DSS contributes to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) by supporting the development of stronger families and more resilient communities. This includes supporting Indigenous families and communities to enjoy similar levels of physical emotional and social wellbeing to that enjoyed by other Australians; supporting families to give children a good start in life; supporting access to affordable housing; and supporting remote strategic investments and remote housing strategies. DSS also contributes to the IAS by supporting eligible Indigenous Australians living in non-remote regions with a disability into work. DSS has funded a new primary national collection of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This will form a significant part of the evidence-base on violence against women and children, and address the gap in data on violence experienced by First Nations peoples. The data collected will inform reporting on Closing the Gap Target 13. DSS works with state and territory governments under Safe and Supported: the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2021-2031 (Safe and Supported) to improve outcomes for children and families who are experiencing disadvantage and/or who are vulnerable. The four focus areas of the National Framework are: early intervention and targeted support for children and families; addressing the over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection systems; improved information and data capability; and strengthening the child and family sector and workforce capability. Safe and Supported is the primary Commonwealth mechanism to support the achievement of Target 12 under the Closing the Gap National Agreement, which seeks to reduce the rate of over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 45 per cent by 2031. DSS is working closely with state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and non-government organisations to develop Safe and Supported first set of Action Plans, including an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan. DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on Domestic and Family Violence, developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan to end violence against women and children. DSS is also working with state and territory governments to finalise the National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children 2022-32 (The National Plan). As part of this work, DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on domestic, family and sexual violence (the Advisory Council). The Advisory Council has been tasked with the development of a specific Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan under the National Plan, and will be consulting widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities during 2022. DSS is also leading the implementation of the Commonwealth response to the recommendations and findings of the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory, working closely with the NIAA, in partnership with the Northern Territory Government and non-government organisations and local communities. DSS is working with the NIAA and the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations on the reform of the Community Development Program (CDP). The Australian Government is committed to delivering a program with real jobs, proper wages and decent conditions. As a first step, CDP providers have been given the opportunity to work with remote communities to trial new approaches to real jobs for income support recipients in remote areas. DSS conducts the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children. The study started in 2008 and follows the development of two cohorts of up to 1,700 children as they transition from infants all the way to adulthood. A range of physical, social and economic information about the child and their family is collected annually. Survey results are used to understand what helps Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children grow up strong. Microdata is publicly released to approved researchers through the Australian Data Archive. DSS is also leading the Early Childhood Targeted Action Plan to support Australia's Disability Strategy 2021-31. It aims to strengthen early identification, information, supports and pathways for young children with disability or developmental concerns, their parent and carers. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse children, their parents and carers. It will also encourage better collaboration between programs and services to support the development and wellbeing of children to help them thrive across and between life stages. DSS is progressing a number of activities to develop the new National Early Childhood program for children with disability or developmental concerns with service delivery expected to commence in late 2022. The program will deliver a range of disability-specific information, workshops and supported playgroups for young children aged 0 to 8 years with disability or developmental concerns. The new program will assist in meeting the Closing the Gap Target 4 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years.

1.5 Program 1.5 - Working Age Payments Department of Social Services

The Department of Social Services (DSS) has policy responsibility for student payments, including ABSTUDY, which provide financial assistance to Indigenous families and students to encourage attendance and retention at school. Some payments (i.e. Relocation Scholarships and Student Start-up Loans) are subject to mutual exclusion provisions for some scholarships which are administered by the NIAA (i.e. Commonwealth Accommodation Costs Scholarship and Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarship) preventing double payment for the same period. DSS contributes to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) by supporting the development of stronger families and more resilient communities. This includes supporting Indigenous families and communities to enjoy similar levels of physical emotional and social wellbeing to that enjoyed by other Australians; supporting families to give children a good start in life; supporting access to affordable housing; and supporting remote strategic investments and remote housing strategies. DSS also contributes to the IAS by supporting eligible Indigenous Australians living in non-remote regions with a disability into work. DSS has funded a new primary national collection of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This will form a significant part of the evidence-base on violence against women and children, and address the gap in data on violence experienced by First Nations peoples. The data collected will inform reporting on Closing the Gap Target 13. DSS works with state and territory governments under Safe and Supported: the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2021-2031 (Safe and Supported) to improve outcomes for children and families who are experiencing disadvantage and/or who are vulnerable. The four focus areas of the National Framework are: early intervention and targeted support for children and families; addressing the over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection systems; improved information and data capability; and strengthening the child and family sector and workforce capability. Safe and Supported is the primary Commonwealth mechanism to support the achievement of Target 12 under the Closing the Gap National Agreement, which seeks to reduce the rate of over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 45 per cent by 2031. DSS is working closely with state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and non-government organisations to develop Safe and Supported first set of Action Plans, including an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan. DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on Domestic and Family Violence, developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan to end violence against women and children. DSS is also working with state and territory governments to finalise the National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children 2022-32 (The National Plan). As part of this work, DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on domestic, family and sexual violence (the Advisory Council). The Advisory Council has been tasked with the development of a specific Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan under the National Plan, and will be consulting widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities during 2022. DSS is also leading the implementation of the Commonwealth response to the recommendations and findings of the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory, working closely with the NIAA, in partnership with the Northern Territory Government and non-government organisations and local communities. DSS is working with the NIAA and the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations on the reform of the Community Development Program (CDP). The Australian Government is committed to delivering a program with real jobs, proper wages and decent conditions. As a first step, CDP providers have been given the opportunity to work with remote communities to trial new approaches to real jobs for income support recipients in remote areas. DSS conducts the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children. The study started in 2008 and follows the development of two cohorts of up to 1,700 children as they transition from infants all the way to adulthood. A range of physical, social and economic information about the child and their family is collected annually. Survey results are used to understand what helps Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children grow up strong. Microdata is publicly released to approved researchers through the Australian Data Archive. DSS is also leading the Early Childhood Targeted Action Plan to support Australia's Disability Strategy 2021-31. It aims to strengthen early identification, information, supports and pathways for young children with disability or developmental concerns, their parent and carers. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse children, their parents and carers. It will also encourage better collaboration between programs and services to support the development and wellbeing of children to help them thrive across and between life stages. DSS is progressing a number of activities to develop the new National Early Childhood program for children with disability or developmental concerns with service delivery expected to commence in late 2022. The program will deliver a range of disability-specific information, workshops and supported playgroups for young children aged 0 to 8 years with disability or developmental concerns. The new program will assist in meeting the Closing the Gap Target 4 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years.

1.6 Program 1.6 - Student Payments Department of Social Services

The Department of Social Services (DSS) has policy responsibility for student payments, including ABSTUDY, which provide financial assistance to Indigenous families and students to encourage attendance and retention at school. Some payments (i.e. Relocation Scholarships and Student Start-up Loans) are subject to mutual exclusion provisions for some scholarships which are administered by the NIAA (i.e. Commonwealth Accommodation Costs Scholarship and Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarship) preventing double payment for the same period. DSS contributes to the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) by supporting the development of stronger families and more resilient communities. This includes supporting Indigenous families and communities to enjoy similar levels of physical emotional and social wellbeing to that enjoyed by other Australians; supporting families to give children a good start in life; supporting access to affordable housing; and supporting remote strategic investments and remote housing strategies. DSS also contributes to the IAS by supporting eligible Indigenous Australians living in non-remote regions with a disability into work. DSS has funded a new primary national collection of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through the Australian Bureau of Statistics. This will form a significant part of the evidence-base on violence against women and children, and address the gap in data on violence experienced by First Nations peoples. The data collected will inform reporting on Closing the Gap Target 13. DSS works with state and territory governments under Safe and Supported: the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2021-2031 (Safe and Supported) to improve outcomes for children and families who are experiencing disadvantage and/or who are vulnerable. The four focus areas of the National Framework are: early intervention and targeted support for children and families; addressing the over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection systems; improved information and data capability; and strengthening the child and family sector and workforce capability. Safe and Supported is the primary Commonwealth mechanism to support the achievement of Target 12 under the Closing the Gap National Agreement, which seeks to reduce the rate of over representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care by 45 per cent by 2031. DSS is working closely with state and territory governments, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders and non-government organisations to develop Safe and Supported first set of Action Plans, including an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan. DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on Domestic and Family Violence, developing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan to end violence against women and children. DSS is also working with state and territory governments to finalise the National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children 2022-32 (The National Plan). As part of this work, DSS supports the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Council on domestic, family and sexual violence (the Advisory Council). The Advisory Council has been tasked with the development of a specific Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan under the National Plan, and will be consulting widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities during 2022. DSS is also leading the implementation of the Commonwealth response to the recommendations and findings of the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory, working closely with the NIAA, in partnership with the Northern Territory Government and non-government organisations and local communities. DSS is working with the NIAA and the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations on the reform of the Community Development Program (CDP). The Australian Government is committed to delivering a program with real jobs, proper wages and decent conditions. As a first step, CDP providers have been given the opportunity to work with remote communities to trial new approaches to real jobs for income support recipients in remote areas. DSS conducts the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children. The study started in 2008 and follows the development of two cohorts of up to 1,700 children as they transition from infants all the way to adulthood. A range of physical, social and economic information about the child and their family is collected annually. Survey results are used to understand what helps Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children grow up strong. Microdata is publicly released to approved researchers through the Australian Data Archive. DSS is also leading the Early Childhood Targeted Action Plan to support Australia's Disability Strategy 2021-31. It aims to strengthen early identification, information, supports and pathways for young children with disability or developmental concerns, their parent and carers. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse children, their parents and carers. It will also encourage better collaboration between programs and services to support the development and wellbeing of children to help them thrive across and between life stages. DSS is progressing a number of activities to develop the new National Early Childhood program for children with disability or developmental concerns with service delivery expected to commence in late 2022. The program will deliver a range of disability-specific information, workshops and supported playgroups for young children aged 0 to 8 years with disability or developmental concerns. The new program will assist in meeting the Closing the Gap Target 4 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children thrive in their early years.

1.1 Program 1.1 - Services to the Community - Social Security and Welfare Services Australia

Payments and services under the IAS are delivered by Services Australia under a number of Indigenous specific and mainstream programs.

1.2 Program 1.2 - Services to the Community - Health Services Australia

Payments and services under the IAS are delivered by Services Australia under a number of Indigenous specific and mainstream programs.

1.3 Program 1.3 - Child Support Services Australia

Payments and services under the IAS are delivered by Services Australia under a number of Indigenous specific and mainstream programs.